The Economist has launched an experiential marketing campaign designed to encourage new subscriptions by dishing out free ice cream with one small twist… all the ice cream contains real insects. In September 2014, The Economist published “Why Eating Insects Makes Sense” – a story which explored the idea of using insects to feed the ever [...]

The Economist has launched an experiential marketing campaign designed to encourage new subscriptions by dishing out free ice cream with one small twist… all the ice cream contains real insects.


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In September 2014, The Economist published “Why Eating Insects Makes Sense” – a story which explored the idea of using insects to feed the ever growing global population, projected to reach 11 billion by the end of the century.
Feeding that many people will be a challenge which is further complicated by the impact of climate change on agriculture, the article argues, but consuming less meat and eating more insects could actually boost food supply and feed the world sustainably.
Working with Sense London, The Economist will take to the streets of London with a branded ice cream delivery tricycle from Friday, 3rd July to Friday, 17th July, with possible August dates to be announced as well. The tricycle will serve four types of ice cream such as Scurry Berry, a fruity ice cream with a mix of insect bits, and the smooth and chocolatey Choc Hopper featuring real grasshopper chunks.
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Marina Haydn, SVP of circulation and retail marketing for The Economist, said: "Experiential marketing approaches are being employed by The Economist as a core element of our global subscription marketing strategy. It is our way of bringing The Economist to potential readers in the real world, real time - and creating a content-laced experience that has been a journey to an area outside of the usual comfort zone.
Haydn continued, "We think this particular story about insects is the kind of mind-stretching material that our globally curious target audience will find particularly interesting, and hopefully, tasty as well.”
The Economist’s ice cream tricycle will be visiting the following areas in London: Clapham Junction, Hampstead Heath, Liverpool Street, Bank, St Paul’s, Moorgate, London Bridge, Borough Market, Greenwich, Waterloo, Farringdon, Canary Wharf, Cheapside and Knightsbridge.