The British Phonographic Industry (BPI) has asked UK's major internet service providers (ISP) to add three more file-sharing websites to its piracy blockade. The BPI claims that three sites including Fenopy, H33t and Kickass Torrents have been involved in illegal music distribution. BPI spokesperson was cited by BBC as saying that same as the Pirate [...]

The British Phonographic Industry (BPI) has asked UK's major internet service providers (ISP) to add three more file-sharing websites to its piracy blockade. The BPI claims that three sites including Fenopy, H33t and Kickass Torrents have been involved in illegal music distribution.


BPI spokesperson was cited by BBC as saying that same as the Pirate Bay, these websites are distributing music illegally, without permission and without paying a penny to the musicians, writers and producers involved in its development.
"Like The Pirate Bay, these websites are profiting illegally from distributing music that isn't theirs, without permission and without paying a penny to the musicians, writers and producers who created it. It is plain wrong," said a BPI spokesperson.
"The existence of these sites damages the growth of Britain's burgeoning digital music sector. We have therefore asked Britain's six biggest ISPs to block access to the sites."
According to BBC, ISPs including BT, Sky, Virgin Media, O2, EE and TalkTalk would comply with the new demand following the introduction of the court's order.
The move follows a separate court order issued in April, in which the court ruled blocking of popular file-sharing site The Pirate Bay in the UK.
The BPI is considering the blocking of the three sites to occur before Christmas this year.
The founder of Pirate Bay, the firm involved in copyright infringement case, has been arrested for assisting copyright violation on the site.