Labour would be the party to benefit most from online voting and compulsory voting in the 2015 UK General Election, according to new research. Broadband Genie surveyed 1,520 people from across the country to gauge their political stance ahead of the election. Key findings of the survey: • Labour would be the party to benefit [...]

Labour would be the party to benefit most from online voting and compulsory voting in the 2015 UK General Election, according to new research.


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Broadband Genie surveyed 1,520 people from across the country to gauge their political stance ahead of the election.
Key findings of the survey:
• Labour would be the party to benefit most if voting was available online, followed by the Conservatives and then the Greens
• Labour would benefit most from compulsory voting with 25% of the 1468 who responded voting Labour
• 36% of those surveyed are not planning to vote at this year's election
• 61.9% admit that they know nothing about the main parties technology manifestos
• The younger generation are less inclined to vote than the older generation
• 60% of those NOT voting said they would do so if they were able to online
The survey asked whether they have or intend to vote this year. More than half of the respondents (64%) said they have or are planning to vote, but there are still a large number (36%) abstaining.
Not surprisingly, the 18-24 and 25-34 age groups are less likely to vote than those who are 55-64 and 65+.
Of the 465 people that are not voting, 60% said they would do if they were able to online. When asked whom they would vote for, Labour was the clear favourite:
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When asked how they would vote if it were compulsory, 1,468 responded and this is how the parties stacked up:
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“Our research shows that people want the ability to vote electronically and are more likely to vote if they could do so online. In this day an age, when you manage all aspects of your life online it would seem natural that we should be able to vote online too.
“It will obviously be a huge and costly undertaking for any government to implement an e-voting system but not an impossible task. One of the biggest concerns cited is around security and this would require a great deal of time and consideration before it can be safely implemented,” said Rob Hilborn, head of strategy, Broadband Genie.
Broadband Genie also asked people if they were aware of the main parties technology manifestos. More than half (61.9%) of the 1415 respondents said they were not aware.
For the full results, click here