What are the key motivations behind ad-blocking? This new research from Global Web Index suggests that annoying ads, rather than privacy issues, drive most people to filtering software. Although ad-blockers are slightly more likely than the average internet user to express privacy and data-related worries, it’s just 3 in 10 of them who are blocking [...]

What are the key motivations behind ad-blocking? This new research from Global Web Index suggests that annoying ads, rather than privacy issues, drive most people to filtering software.


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Although ad-blockers are slightly more likely than the average internet user to express privacy and data-related worries, it’s just 3 in 10 of them who are blocking ads because they believe they compromise their privacy.
Similarly, it’s just a quarter who are blocking them because they dislike ads which are personalized based on their browsing history. It’s not that these privacy concerns are unimportant, it’s just that there are much bigger motivations at work.
In fact, the key finding here is that no matter the gender, age or income of the person, or the part of the world in which they live, they are most likely to be blocking ads because they feel that too many of them are annoying or irrelevant and because they believe there are too many ads on the internet.
The industry might like to emphasize how ads fund free content but until there’s more control over the quantity and quality of ads – and until consumer experience is prioritized over numbers of ads served – there’s unlikely to be a major shift in attitude.
Source: Global Web Index