Brands should consider the diversity of U.S. mobile users in digital campaigns, as 58% of Hispanics and African Americans owning smartphones versus 52% of Caucasians and Asians, according to new research. The study, from Razorfish, found that multicultural consumers have different digital consumption habits, with 23% connecting on social with friends and family, compared to [...]

Brands should consider the diversity of U.S. mobile users in digital campaigns, as 58% of Hispanics and African Americans owning smartphones versus 52% of Caucasians and Asians, according to new research.


The study, from Razorfish, found that multicultural consumers have different digital consumption habits, with 23% connecting on social with friends and family, compared to just 17% of Caucasians doing the same.
In addition, the study found that African-Americans have fewer laptop and desktop devices than do white and Asian Americans.
A panel examining cultural determinants in social media from a marketing perspective took a look at some of the stats as a conversational springboard.
The study found that 23% percent of multicultural consumers connect with family and friends on social, versus 17% of Caucasians, for example.
Whats more, 9% of both white and African American and Hispanic consumers are "culturally connected" on social, the study found.
The Razorfish study also looked at differences in use of specific social media channels: 35% of whites polled favor Facebook versus 24% of multiculturals; but for Instagram, 14% of African American and HIspanics favored that channel versus 4% of whites, while Twitter skews white by five percentage points (13% white, 8% multicultural).
In terms of popularity among college students, Instagram challenges Facebook, with 49% of multiculturals saying the former is dominant. Fifty-three said Snapchat, followed by LinkedIn at 30%. Then comes Twitter, Yik Yak, and Vine and Facebook.
www.razorfish.com