Latest news on the cookie saga comes from UK Communications Minister Ed Vaizey who is pushing for a two-tier approach to the new EU regulations on the use of cookies in online marketing. They’re looking at working with browser manufacturers to get one-click approval for cookie downloads, while pushing the ad industry to group together [...]

Latest news on the cookie saga comes from UK Communications Minister Ed Vaizey who is pushing for a two-tier approach to the new EU regulations on the use of cookies in online marketing. They’re looking at working with browser manufacturers to get one-click approval for cookie downloads, while pushing the ad industry to group together to serve behavioural advertising cookies with more structure. Would a ‘behavioural targeting’ icon in the ad work for either the publisher or advertiser? Great that DCMS is being more pragmatic and sympathetic to the UK marketing industry and talking of “flexibility is essential for innovation and new business models.” But will this really give the result advertisers need, or will it boost opt-outs? Judge for yourself, here…


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The UK will adopt a controversial European Union cookie law after 25 May, the government has announced.
The news comes as EU regulators said they were separately set to investigate internet service providers' data traffic management practices, in an attempt to fight against a 'two-tier' internet.
Under the new UK cookie regulations, users will have to give permission for websites to install cookies on their internet browsers. The announcement is being branded by some as a major concession to advertisers and those selling web ad space.
Ed Vaizey, communications minister, said the UK will first work with software vendors to make sure users are able to give permission on an ongoing basis, the Daily Telegraph reported.
Secondly, websites that use tracking cookies will notify people via an icon in the corner of their advertisements – people can then choose to opt out.
“We recognise that work on the technical solutions for cookie use will not be complete by the [25 May] implementation deadline,” said Vaizey. “It will take time for meaningful solutions to be developed, evaluated and rolled out.”
19/04/2011