How do mobile gamers use social media? Males go to YouTube, Females go to Facebook (infographic)

Nov 17, 2014 | Marketing through gaming, Mobile

With the success of Angry Birds, Temple Run and Candy Crush Saga, mobile gaming has become big business for advertisers and game developers alike. But how can marketers tap into this highly tech savvy audience? New research looks into the digital habits of the gaming generation. In a post Angry (and flappy) Bird world, mobile […]

With the success of Angry Birds, Temple Run and Candy Crush Saga, mobile gaming has become big business for advertisers and game developers alike. But how can marketers tap into this highly tech savvy audience? New research looks into the digital habits of the gaming generation.


In a post Angry (and flappy) Bird world, mobile gaming has become big business for advertisers and game developers alike. But how can marketers tap into this highly tech savvy audience? New research looks into the digital habits of the gaming generation.
The study, from mobile gaming network, Everyplay, indicates that the biggest spenders on games aren’t bored teens on their smartphones, but highly-competitive men from Generation X.
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The 30-page white paper, called “Mobile Gaming: Social Motivations.” surveyed 3,000 US mobile gamers.
The study found that 29% of a game’s total revenue comes from less than 1% of the players.
This 1% spend more than $50 a month and are more likely to share game content on Facebook, YouTube and Pinterest.
The study found that men spend twice as much on mobile games as women do but Women still download an average of 2.64 games a month, compared to men’s 2.92.
Mobile game discovery- apps store, YouTube and Facebook lead the way
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Most gamers use app store features and top charts when they’re looking for a new game.
To reach male gamers, online video is the best medium. Game websites came in second and after that it drops off drastically for men.
For women, Facebook posts and invite to play far outweighed gameplay videos and websites.
Women were also more likely to click in-app and Facebook advertising. It’s good to know that someone is paying attention.
View an infographic showing key findings here:
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The full whitepaper can be downloaded here.

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