The location of your mobile phone is added to the list of sweeping new police powers in the regulation of personal data and Deputy PM Clegg leads the attack on his own government. The government’s new plans of personal data would give police and intelligence services the power to monitor all email and internet use [...]

The location of your mobile phone is added to the list of sweeping new police powers in the regulation of personal data and Deputy PM Clegg leads the attack on his own government.


The government’s new plans of personal data would give police and intelligence services the power to monitor all email and internet use in the UK.
The draft proposals have lead deputy prime minister Nick Clegg to attack his own coalition partners, saying he would block the draft Communications Data Bill and push for plans ensuring "the balance between security and liberty".
His comments came as a committee of MPs and peers criticised the bill's scope.
The Home Office said the new laws were needed "without delay" to stop serious crimes such as terrorism.
Under the plans, internet service providers would have to store details of all online communication in the UK, such as the time, duration, originator and recipient of a communication and the location of the device from which it was made.
Police would not need to seek permission to access this, if investigating a crime, but they would require a warrant to be able to see the content of any messages.
Civil liberties campaigners have described the proposals as a "snooper's charter", but Home Secretary Theresa May insists they are vital for countering paedophiles, extremists and fraudsters.
A report from the Joint Committee on the Draft Communications Bill, made up of MPs and peers, accepted a new law was needed to help police fight crime and tackle security threats organised online.
But it warned ministers would be able to demand "potentially limitless categories of data" unless the draft bill was amended.
Data Communications Bill- a summary
• The Bill would extend the range of data telecoms firms have to store for up to 12 months
• It would include, for the first time, details of messages sent on social media, webmail, voice calls over the internet and gaming, in addition to emails and phone calls
• The data would include the time, duration, originator and recipient of a communication and the location of the device from which it was made
• It would not include the content of messages - what is being said. Officers would need a warrant to see that
• But they would not need the permission of a judge to see details of the time and place of messages, provided they were investigating a crime or protecting national security
• Four bodies would have access to data: the police, the Serious and Organised Crime Agency, the intelligence agencies and HM Revenue and Customs
• Local authorities would face restrictions on the kinds of data they can access

Share This