In the month when US online ad revenues overtook broadcast TV for the first time, the days of TV’s ad dominance look numbered. While the medium still lags behind total TV ad revenue ($42bn Vs $66bn) it’s clear that neglecting digital marketing is no longer an option for modern brands. Even ‘old media’ empires such […]

In the month when US online ad revenues overtook broadcast TV for the first time, the days of TV’s ad dominance look numbered. While the medium still lags behind total TV ad revenue ($42bn Vs $66bn) it’s clear that neglecting digital marketing is no longer an option for modern brands.


Even ‘old media’ empires such as Disney are busy securing digital assets to protect their future. This month the firm bought Maker Studios, the largest channel on YouTube, giving the media giant an extra billion global viewers online.
Looking at the major players, April saw Facebook’s profits triple as mobile now accounts for a staggering 59% of its ad revenue. The social network’s ‘mobile first’ strategy is certainly paying off- giving rivals and brands a strong reason to re-examine their own mobile investments. Indeed, Twitter’s new site revamp bears a striking resemblance to its larger rival as it looks to compete as a public company.
Elsewhere, Google continued its quest to link online and offline behaviour with a new in-store mobile shopping trial in the US. Further rumours of its Android TV platform hinted at how video consumption is changing, while Google Glass finally went on sale… for one day only.
Finally, the Heartbleed bug provided a stark reminder of the dangers of digital as two-thirds of the web was hit by a flaw that potentially exposed private passwords to hackers. User data looks set to become a major marketing battleground in the years to come- and brands that balance security with ad relevance will reap the rewards.

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